Mother charged for kidnapping daughter and fleeing to Nicaragua

Not all families look the same or start the same way; however, when children are involved, there will be issues concerning them when and if the family is divided due to a divorce or breakup. Thus, when parents in Texas and elsewhere are faced with child custody issues, it is imperative that they consider how best to address the situation whether an individual is a biological parent or adoptive parent or was in a marriage, civil union or relationship.

While it is ideal to amicably resolve custody matters, this is not always the case. In some cases, parents or former partners cannot agree, resulting in drastic measures taken. While state and federal laws help protect child custody orders, if a parent decides to leave the country, this could evolve into a complex international custody matter.

Child kidnapping charges

After nearly 12 years in Nicaragua, a mother turned herself into U.S. authorities. She supposedly went to the U.S. Embassy located in Nicaragua and turned herself in for kidnapping her daughter in 2009 and fleeing to the country. Her daughter is now 18-years-old and her biological mother is being held in a federal detention center in Miami on charges for kidnapping and conspiracy.

High profile custody case

This matter began in 2003, when a same sex couple in a civil union ended their relationship and dissolved their union. The couple had a daughter together, with one partner going through in vitro fertilization and carrying the child to term. A year after their daughter was born, the relationship got rocky and they dissolved their union. Initially, the biological mother had all rights because the state she moved to did not recognize civil union. However, it was soon ordered that her ex-partner would have visitation rights.

She refused to comply with the visitation order, which resulted in the possibility of her ex being granted sole custody of the daughter. This was met with the biological mother fleeing the country with their daughter to Nicaragua. Now, the biological mother faces criminal charges as well as a civil suit for fleeing the country.

Child custody matters can range from minor to major. Nonetheless, it is imperative that parents take steps to work through them and reach a resolution that not only uphold their rights but also meets the best interests of the child or children involved.

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